This flat-pack bamboo bench and trestle by German designer Stefan Diez is held together with string and doesn't require any tools or fixings to assemble.

Soba by Stefan Diez

Diez showed the Soba collection, which he designed in 2015, during his talk at the Design Indaba conference in Cape Town earlier this month.

It features a bamboo bench and a pair of trestles that can support a tabletop. Each trunk has been left in its natural state, and the furniture is assembled by threading cords through the canes and tying individual parts together.

Soba by Stefan Diez

The furniture, which can be delivered flat-pack, uses strong kevlar rope that ends in a wooden handle, allowing joints to be tightened once the pieces are assembled.

Canes for the legs of the trestles have been cut to leave a connecting strip that wraps around the top part.

Soba by Stefan Diez

The Munich-based industrial designer created the series in partnership with non-profit initiative Japan Creative, which emphasises the use of traditional Japanese crafts for contemporary pieces. Each year it invites three designers from Europe and the US to take part in workshops on traditional materials or ways of working.

Soba by Stefan Diez

Diez – who has also created experimental office furniture for small workplaces – had the chance to collaborate with a bamboo factory.

He decided to use untreated canes as a contrast to Japan's many uses of processed bamboo – in yarn, brush bristles, or woven baskets, for example.

Soba by Stefan Diez

The furniture takes only a few moments to assemble, with its unprocessed surface gradually changing from light green to grey as it ages.

Barber and Osgerby's Hotaru lighting collection similarly borrowed from Japanese history, using an age-old method of making paper lanterns.

Soba by Stefan Diez

Other attempts to incorporate traditional materials and crafts into contemporary pieces include a furniture collection by Studioilse that used a UNESCO-nominated carving technique, and a set of stools "tattooed" in decorations chiselled by hand.

The post Stefan Diez's Soba bamboo furniture naturally changes colour over time appeared first on Dezeen.